This originally started out as a comment on Chinese Hacks, specifically on this post (which mentions me, so I have to thank them graciously for their retweets and mentions, thanks!), but I decided to also post it here.

In addition, most of Taiwan’s government resource websites provide a lot of Chinese<>English glossaries, especially for their particular area. Some examples:

Medical terms provided by Taipei City’s department of health (www.health.gov.tw):

http://www.health.gov.tw/dictionary_ch.htm

Medical term’s from Taiwan’s Centers for Disease Control (www.cdc.gov.tw):

http://www.cdc.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=3053&CtNode=1474&mp=1

Meteorological terms from Taiwan’s Central Weather Bureau (www.cwb.gov.tw)

http://www.cwb.gov.tw/V6/public/Bilingual_Glossary.htm

Railway terms from Taiwan Railway Administration (www.railway.gov.tw)

http://www.railway.gov.tw/tw/cp.aspx?sn=7390

More terms, both website and immigration related provided by Taiwan’s Immigration office:

http://iff.immigration.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=1092769&CtNode=32285&mp=T001

Anyway, that’s already quite a lot so I think I’ll stop here for now. These are good for popping into Anki, doing a Chinese—>English card format. I would suggest just testing yourself on the phrase as a whole, learning to recognize it, not the individual characters in it (though pronunciation is important!). Many times, these will be helpful on signs or as you read through material. Or, I may Google them and get larger contexts for them for cloze deletions.

I’m using these two methods and if it isn’t apparent yet I haven’t quite decided which one I prefer!

As you can tell, looking for “雙語詞彙” on a website will bring you to these pages. You can also try popping it into Google to see what comes up, though I have not tried it myself yet.

Feel free to share your finds—Chinese or any other language that interests you in the comments!